What you can know more about “Crocodile Tears”

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We have heard and read a lot about crocodile tears. I can even say with full conviction that you may have used it or someone told you this expression “you cry with crocodile tears”. But what is hidden behind this expression, how true is it?

The expression that implies false emotions actually comes from an ancient legend that crocodiles cry when they kill their prey. In fact there is something real, the glands that keep their eyes wet are located near the throat, the moment crocodiles tear their prey the glands are compressed provoking the shedding of tears.

“Crocodile tears” is a true expression, despite the interpretation that has been made over time, which is directly related to the development of humanity.

The phrase stems from an ancient belief that crocodiles shed tears while consuming their prey. Crocodiles have tear ducts, which secrete a fluid from the glands into the sinuses, known as “crocodile tears”, which typically lubricate their eyes. However, the data suggests that this may have been caused by nutrition.

Even in the field of medicine this could not but enter. Crocodile tear syndrome is a consequence of partial paralysis of the face. A malfunction of the patient’s nerves causes occasional shedding of tears. Russian neuropathologist FA Bogorad was the first to describe the pathology and its etiology since 1926, to leave it in the history of medicine as “the symptom of crocodile tears”)

“Crocodile tears”, like any other phenomenon, he did not run away without interest and without obtaining, even anecdotes, according to which the crocodile sheds tears to pity the victim who ate.

Writer Edward Topsell offers a different explanation for “Crocodile Tears.” He argues that: ‚ÄúThere is no animal that cries for no reason. Such is the crocodile. He goes too far when he thinks the crocodile uses tears as a bait to lovingly lure its prey. However, Topsell also refers to old stories, which talk about the crocodile that cries when a man eats, comparing to the Tears of Judas, that false biblical repentance of the traitor of Jesus of Nazareth.

“Crocodile Tears” first became the subject of fairy tales for the first time in English in Sir John Mandeville’s 14th century stories.

But also the greatest of world tragedy, the Englishman William Shakespeare, has used several times in his monumental work the allegory of “Crocodile Tears”. He uses it in both versions, as a hoax and as a false repentance. An obvious example is Othello, Act IV, Scene I, in which Othello convinces himself that his wife is cheating on him. Also the great tragicomedy inserts this also Henry VI, Part II, Act III, Scene I, in which he refers to the false emotions of the Duke of Gloucester, to Richard III. In Anthony and Cleopatra, Act II, Scene VII, Mark Antony rebukes Lepidus.


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